Office of Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Training Courses

Educational trainings with select courses rewarding Dental CE's


ASHLine/AHCCCS Dental Providers' Webinar: Youth E-Cigarette/Vaping Cessation

Panel Discussion ~ Free 1 CEUs


This webinar will provide an overview of youth e-cigarette /vaping and how dental providers can play a role in combating the vaping epidemic. While national and state-level commercial tobacco use among youth and young adults are at all-time low prevalence rates, the use of e-cigarettes or vaping products among this age group continues to rise. Dental professionals are uniquely positioned to screen patients for vaping (Ask) and provide advice at every patient encounter (Advise) to connect patients to evidence-based cessation resources (Refer), including the state quitline.


This webinar will present recent updates to AHCCCS CDT codes and the ability to be reimbursed for providing tobacco/vaping and other substance use education to patients and how to refer individuals to evidence-based cessation interventions.

This webinar will provide an overview of youth e-cigarette /vaping and how dental providers can play a role in combating the vaping epidemic. While national and state-level commercial tobacco use among youth and young adults are at all-time low prevalence rates, the use of e-cigarettes or vaping products among this age group continues to rise. Dental professionals are uniquely positioned to screen patients for vaping (Ask) and provide advice at every patient encounter (Advise) to connect patients to evidence-based cessation resources (Refer), including the state quitline.


This webinar will present recent updates to AHCCCS CDT codes and the ability to be reimbursed for providing tobacco/vaping and other substance use education to patients and how to refer individuals to evidence-based cessation interventions.

Tools to Support Clients to Reduce Nicotine Dependency

University of Arizona: Arizona Center for Tobacco Cessation


Course Overview

Understanding the clinical pharmacology of nicotine provides a basis for improved nicotine dependency prevention and treatment. This course will help tobacco cessation coaches and specialists, nurses, medical and behavioral health practitioners gain profound knowledge of the addiction process and tools to support clients to quit smoking. The content of the course is applicable to e-cigarettes or vapes as well as conventional tobacco products. 

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, you will be able to:

  1. Define the process of nicotine dependency
  2. Describe the biological, psychological, and socio-cultural chain of addiction
  3. Identify patients' level of nicotine dependency.
  4. Understand the “Stages of Change” model to assess patients' readiness to reduce tobacco use
  5. Utilize tools to help motivate a patient to reduce nicotine dependency

Target Audience: Tobacco cessation coaches and specialists, nurses, medical and behavioral health practitioners

Duration: 90 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 1.5 Continuing Competency Credits for CHES 

CHES Provider number:  99036

Format:  Web-based Training, Self-Study. 

Created/Updated: June 2021

Author(s): 

Mark Boldt, Director, Tobacco Cessation Training Institute.

Judith S Gordon, Ph.D. Associate Dean, Research Member of the Graduate Faculty. Professor, BIO5 Institute. Professor, Family and Community Medicine. Professor, Nursing.

Arranged by: Dipanwita Das, Senior Instructional Designer. 

Disclosures: The planners, reviewers, and authors have no declared conflicts of interest 

Course Overview

Understanding the clinical pharmacology of nicotine provides a basis for improved nicotine dependency prevention and treatment. This course will help tobacco cessation coaches and specialists, nurses, medical and behavioral health practitioners gain profound knowledge of the addiction process and tools to support clients to quit smoking. The content of the course is applicable to e-cigarettes or vapes as well as conventional tobacco products. 

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, you will be able to:

  1. Define the process of nicotine dependency
  2. Describe the biological, psychological, and socio-cultural chain of addiction
  3. Identify patients' level of nicotine dependency.
  4. Understand the “Stages of Change” model to assess patients' readiness to reduce tobacco use
  5. Utilize tools to help motivate a patient to reduce nicotine dependency

Target Audience: Tobacco cessation coaches and specialists, nurses, medical and behavioral health practitioners

Duration: 90 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 1.5 Continuing Competency Credits for CHES 

CHES Provider number:  99036

Format:  Web-based Training, Self-Study. 

Created/Updated: June 2021

Author(s): 

Mark Boldt, Director, Tobacco Cessation Training Institute.

Judith S Gordon, Ph.D. Associate Dean, Research Member of the Graduate Faculty. Professor, BIO5 Institute. Professor, Family and Community Medicine. Professor, Nursing.

Arranged by: Dipanwita Das, Senior Instructional Designer. 

Disclosures: The planners, reviewers, and authors have no declared conflicts of interest 

Electronic Cigarettes and their Impact on Public Health

University of Arizona: Arizona Center for Tobacco Cessation


Course Overview

Electronic (e-) cigarettes are evolving rapidly, providing consumers with various products to choose from: e-cig-a-likes, mini-cartridge devices, and tank systems filled with liquid nicotine. These devices are legally available to adults (21 years and older) and have grown in popularity among youth (14-19 years old). E-cigarette use poses a significant and avoidable health risk to young people in the United States. There is much unknown about these products and their adverse effects on public health. In this short training, we will define and classify the types of e-cigarette. We will then compare the impact of e-cigarettes on health to combustible cigarettes, followed by health consequences.

The Western Region Public Health Training Center (WRPHTC) developed a series of courses (six) in collaboration with the Arizona Center for Tobacco Cessation (ACTC) to provide public health professionals with an understanding of tobacco dependency and evidence-based treatment that supports quitting. 

Note: For these modules, the term tobacco will refer specifically to commercial tobacco, a legal and regulated substance, and does not refer to the traditional tobacco grown and harvested by American Indians and Alaska Natives used for ceremonial or medicinal purposes.

Learning Objectives: 

By the end of this training, you will be able to:
  1. Generalize the prevalence of electronic cigarette (e-cigarettes) use among adults and youth
  2. Classify the types of e-cigarettes
  3. Describe the impact of the e-cigarette on health
  4. Distinguish the impact of e-cigarettes on health to combustibles cigarettes

Target Audience: Health and human service providers, medical and allied health professionals and students, community health influencers, administrators, policymakers, and those in specialty areas of health and human service professions: Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Physicians, Pharmacists, Health Educators, Wellness Coaches, Dental Hygienists, Addiction Counselors, Respiratory Therapists, etc.

Duration:  35 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 0.5 CECH for CHES

Format:  Web-based Training, Self-Study

Disclosures:  The planners, reviewers, and authors have no declared conflicts of interest

Created/Updated: January 2021

Authors: 

Mark Boldt, Director, Tobacco Cessation Training Institute.
Jazmin C. Villavicencio, Tobacco Treatment Training Specialist
Krista Walker, Tobacco Cessation Training Specialist

Dipanwita Das, Senior Instructional Designer


Course Overview

Electronic (e-) cigarettes are evolving rapidly, providing consumers with various products to choose from: e-cig-a-likes, mini-cartridge devices, and tank systems filled with liquid nicotine. These devices are legally available to adults (21 years and older) and have grown in popularity among youth (14-19 years old). E-cigarette use poses a significant and avoidable health risk to young people in the United States. There is much unknown about these products and their adverse effects on public health. In this short training, we will define and classify the types of e-cigarette. We will then compare the impact of e-cigarettes on health to combustible cigarettes, followed by health consequences.

The Western Region Public Health Training Center (WRPHTC) developed a series of courses (six) in collaboration with the Arizona Center for Tobacco Cessation (ACTC) to provide public health professionals with an understanding of tobacco dependency and evidence-based treatment that supports quitting. 

Note: For these modules, the term tobacco will refer specifically to commercial tobacco, a legal and regulated substance, and does not refer to the traditional tobacco grown and harvested by American Indians and Alaska Natives used for ceremonial or medicinal purposes.

Learning Objectives: 

By the end of this training, you will be able to:
  1. Generalize the prevalence of electronic cigarette (e-cigarettes) use among adults and youth
  2. Classify the types of e-cigarettes
  3. Describe the impact of the e-cigarette on health
  4. Distinguish the impact of e-cigarettes on health to combustibles cigarettes

Target Audience: Health and human service providers, medical and allied health professionals and students, community health influencers, administrators, policymakers, and those in specialty areas of health and human service professions: Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Physicians, Pharmacists, Health Educators, Wellness Coaches, Dental Hygienists, Addiction Counselors, Respiratory Therapists, etc.

Duration:  35 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 0.5 CECH for CHES

Format:  Web-based Training, Self-Study

Disclosures:  The planners, reviewers, and authors have no declared conflicts of interest

Created/Updated: January 2021

Authors: 

Mark Boldt, Director, Tobacco Cessation Training Institute.
Jazmin C. Villavicencio, Tobacco Treatment Training Specialist
Krista Walker, Tobacco Cessation Training Specialist

Dipanwita Das, Senior Instructional Designer


Tobacco Use and Health Consequences

University of Arizona: Arizona Center for Tobacco Cessation


Course Overview

Tobacco was first discovered and used by indigenous people in the American continent and was later introduced to Europe and the rest of the world. Today, indigenous people worldwide continue to utilize the tobacco plant for medicinal and ceremonial purposes and is often referred to as traditional or sacred tobacco.

This training focuses specifically on commercial tobacco*, which contains many additional substances and chemicals. It is a legal substance that is regulated and marketed to consumers through various products that can be burned, heated, or chewed. Throughout this training, we will define and classify tobacco, present the prevalence of tobacco use among diverse populations, describe the adverse health effects caused by tobacco use, and then share the positive health effects of quitting. 

The Western Region Public Health Training Center (WRPHTC) developed a series of courses (six) in collaboration with the Arizona Center for Tobacco Cessation (ACTC) to provide public health professionals with an understanding of tobacco dependency and evidence-based treatment that supports quitting.

*For these modules, the term tobacco will refer specifically to commercial tobacco, a legal and regulated substance, and does not refer to the traditional tobacco grown and harvested by American Indians and Alaska Natives used for ceremonial or medicinal purposes.


Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, you will be able to: 
1. Generalize the prevalence of tobacco use among diverse populations
2. Classify the types of tobacco products
3. Describe the adverse health effects caused by tobacco dependency
4. Explain the positive health effects associated with quitting tobacco 

Target Audience: Health and human service providers, medical and allied health professionals and students, community health influencers, administrators, policymakers, and those in specialty areas of health and human service professions: Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Physicians, Pharmacists, Health Educators, Wellness Coaches, Dental Hygienists, Addiction Counselors, Respiratory Therapists, etc.

Duration:  45 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 0.75 Continuing Competency Credits for CHES

Format:  Web-based Training, Self-Study

Disclosures:  The planners, reviewers, and authors have no declared conflicts of interest

Created/Updated: January 2021

Authors: 

Mark Boldt, Director, Tobacco Cessation Training Institute.
Jazmin C. Villavicencio, Tobacco Treatment Training Specialist
Krista Walker, Tobacco Cessation Training Specialist

Dipanwita Das, Senior Instructional Designer

Course Overview

Tobacco was first discovered and used by indigenous people in the American continent and was later introduced to Europe and the rest of the world. Today, indigenous people worldwide continue to utilize the tobacco plant for medicinal and ceremonial purposes and is often referred to as traditional or sacred tobacco.

This training focuses specifically on commercial tobacco*, which contains many additional substances and chemicals. It is a legal substance that is regulated and marketed to consumers through various products that can be burned, heated, or chewed. Throughout this training, we will define and classify tobacco, present the prevalence of tobacco use among diverse populations, describe the adverse health effects caused by tobacco use, and then share the positive health effects of quitting. 

The Western Region Public Health Training Center (WRPHTC) developed a series of courses (six) in collaboration with the Arizona Center for Tobacco Cessation (ACTC) to provide public health professionals with an understanding of tobacco dependency and evidence-based treatment that supports quitting.

*For these modules, the term tobacco will refer specifically to commercial tobacco, a legal and regulated substance, and does not refer to the traditional tobacco grown and harvested by American Indians and Alaska Natives used for ceremonial or medicinal purposes.


Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, you will be able to: 
1. Generalize the prevalence of tobacco use among diverse populations
2. Classify the types of tobacco products
3. Describe the adverse health effects caused by tobacco dependency
4. Explain the positive health effects associated with quitting tobacco 

Target Audience: Health and human service providers, medical and allied health professionals and students, community health influencers, administrators, policymakers, and those in specialty areas of health and human service professions: Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Physicians, Pharmacists, Health Educators, Wellness Coaches, Dental Hygienists, Addiction Counselors, Respiratory Therapists, etc.

Duration:  45 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 0.75 Continuing Competency Credits for CHES

Format:  Web-based Training, Self-Study

Disclosures:  The planners, reviewers, and authors have no declared conflicts of interest

Created/Updated: January 2021

Authors: 

Mark Boldt, Director, Tobacco Cessation Training Institute.
Jazmin C. Villavicencio, Tobacco Treatment Training Specialist
Krista Walker, Tobacco Cessation Training Specialist

Dipanwita Das, Senior Instructional Designer

Opioid Prescribing CME Courses

Responding to the Public Health Emergency


This series of courses is accessible to Arizona DEA Prescribers by establishing an account through the link below.


The price for a CME certificate is now $25.00 per credit.

(CDC funding for AZ prescribers has expired. Gratis CME certificates are NOT available, as they were between 2015 and 2020.)

Courses
  • Introduction to Safe Prescribing of Opioids for Pain Management (1 CME Credit)
  • Safe and Effective Opioid Prescribing While Managing Acute and Chronic Pain (3 CME Credits)
  • Managing Opioid Misuse Disorder in Pregnancy and Neonatal Care (1 CME Credit)
  • Opioid Issues in Youth Pain Management for Orthopedic Injuries (1 CME Credit)

This series of courses is accessible to Arizona DEA Prescribers by establishing an account through the link below.


The price for a CME certificate is now $25.00 per credit.

(CDC funding for AZ prescribers has expired. Gratis CME certificates are NOT available, as they were between 2015 and 2020.)

Courses
  • Introduction to Safe Prescribing of Opioids for Pain Management (1 CME Credit)
  • Safe and Effective Opioid Prescribing While Managing Acute and Chronic Pain (3 CME Credits)
  • Managing Opioid Misuse Disorder in Pregnancy and Neonatal Care (1 CME Credit)
  • Opioid Issues in Youth Pain Management for Orthopedic Injuries (1 CME Credit)

Early Childhood Oral Health **FREE LIVE CE**

First Teeth First * Office of Oral Health


Looking for “Live CE”?  Maricopa County Department of Public Health offers Early Childhood Oral Health continuing education for individuals and groups.

  • Recognizing the stages of Early Childhood Caries (ECC)

  • Consequences, etiology, and prevalence of dental caries through childhood
  • Assessing child's risk of developing caries
  • Caries management strategies
  • Prevention strategies through risk assessment, oral hygiene, fluoride, diet, and establishment of a dental home
  • Child, family, and community influences on oral health outcomes of children


Contact Jackie Sutter, BS, RDH at

jackie.sutter@maricopa.gov or 602-639-1927

Looking for “Live CE”?  Maricopa County Department of Public Health offers Early Childhood Oral Health continuing education for individuals and groups.

  • Recognizing the stages of Early Childhood Caries (ECC)

  • Consequences, etiology, and prevalence of dental caries through childhood
  • Assessing child's risk of developing caries
  • Caries management strategies
  • Prevention strategies through risk assessment, oral hygiene, fluoride, diet, and establishment of a dental home
  • Child, family, and community influences on oral health outcomes of children


Contact Jackie Sutter, BS, RDH at

jackie.sutter@maricopa.gov or 602-639-1927